tmsforacure.org



- Document List for Download
- Members

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- Locations

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- Definition
- Diagnosis and Classification
- Symptoms
- Treatment
- Prognosis
- Mast Cell Activation Disorders
- Sources

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- Introduction
- Age of Onset
- Presentation
- Possible Symptoms/Occurance Rates
- Guidelines For Acquiring a Diagnosis
- Treatment Guidelines
- Prognosis
- References

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- What Are Mast Cell Diseases?
- Avoid Triggers
- Drugs to Administer with Caution
- Anaphylaxis Severity
- Call for Help
- Epinephrine
- Bronchospasm and Angioedema
- Cardiac Arrhythmias
- Hypotension
- Continuation of Care
- Precautions For Mastocytosis
- What Else Should I Know?
- References

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- Article

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- Card 1 - Front
- Card 1 - Back
- Card 2 - Front
- Card 2 - Back

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document
- Reference Articles
- Abstract - Immunotherapy
- Abstract - WHO Criteria
- Abstract - Pregnancy in Mastocytosis
- Abstract - Characteristics of Clonal MCAD
- Abstract - Background Diagnostic Criteria

Download Printable File
PDF | Word Document


Pediatric Mastocytosis Fact Sheet

Introduction

Pediatric Mastocytosis is a rare disease characterized by the presence of too many mast cells in the skin, and possibly other tissues. Mast cells are instrumental in mediating anaphylaxis, and children with mastocytosis are at risk to develop both provoked and unprovoked episodes of anaphylaxis. Pediatric mastocytosis may involve the bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract, and symptoms in children can vary greatly from child to child. Basic treatment includes the avoidance of known triggers, having injectable epinephrine available at all times, H1 and H2 antihistamines to control itching and gastric acid hyper secretion, and a mast cell stabilizer. IV steroids may be necessary to treat progressive, severe bullae in infants. Many children may not complain of specific symptoms, may not be able to identify or localize a symptom, or may have every symptom while others may have very few.

 
 
Image Use Policy  |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map  |  Contact Info 
© 2011 The Mastocytosis Society - All Rights Reserved